Urgent Care - Gardendale
210 Fieldstown Road, Suite 124
Gardendale, AL 35071
205-285-8252
 

Except for the actual diagnosis and treatment, not all of medicine needs to be somber and serious. This page is intended to give you a look at the lighter, and, often, more interesting side of medical topics. From time to time, we will add to these various pieces of information and short stories. We hope you'll enjoy them and we look forward to seeing you at VMAC when you need us!

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If you see a doctor for a problem that persists or worsens and you need to return for the same problem, a medical axiom that should be put in action is to "escalate the workup". In other words, it is incumbent on the provider to do more testing/investigating on a return visit. In Emergency Medicine, these types of return visits are called "bouncebacks".

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Wars have always provided opportunities for medical research in trauma care. For example, a great debate during the Civil War was whether open chest wounds should be left open so air could escape, or, closed so it couldn't escape. The correct answer was neither: the correct treatment is to use a bandage closed on three sides with the fourth side acting as a one-way valve to allow air under pressure to escape and then to prevent air from entering through the wound. Needless to say, the mortality from this piece of "research" was astronomical!

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In medicine it's generally accepted that the most intense pain is from heart attack, labor, or, kidney stone in no particular order. But I once took care of someone in the ED who had a yellow jacket alive and stuck in his ear...how could that NOT make the list?

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A (true) short story from the ER:

Many years ago, I saw an elderly woman who had fever, muscle aches, headache and generally feeling badly. After the usual labs and xrays I was happy to tell her:

"Mrs. _____ I'm happy to tell you that it's just a virus."

She looked at me and smiled and said:

"Doctor....AIDS is 'just' a virus"

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A recent poll and study showed that 90% of all people reading medical information on the internet, regardless of level of education, did NOT feel they really understood what they were reading! A simple explanation: Reading medicine is like trying to read a foreign language without knowing the vocabulary.

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Once in a while, routine bloodwork shows an extremely abnormal  result usually for a single test. If this happens, the best strategy for your provider is to simply repeat that one test as these are usually due to lab error if there is no other ready explanation. Until this is done especially in the absence of other findings to point to an expected abnormal lab, you should not have to go through a "Mayo Clinic" workup. The repeat single test is usually back to normal as expected. In medicine, these temporarily "abnormal" labs are referred to as a "useless pieces of positive information".